Last edited by printed for M. Cooper
25.07.2021 | History

1 edition of An enquiry into the causes of the present high price of muscovada sugars; with some remedies, humbly proposed for a grievance so considerable. In a letter to a member of parliament found in the catalog.

An enquiry into the causes of the present high price of muscovada sugars; with some remedies, humbly proposed for a grievance so considerable. In a letter to a member of parliament

[catalogue dune exposition], 7 novembre 1972-26 février 1973.

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      • Microfilm. Woodbridge, CT Research Publications, Inc., 1986. 1 reel ; 35mm. (The Eighteenth Century ; reel 7022, no.06).

        Statementprinted for M. Cooper
        Publishersprinted for M. Cooper
        Classifications
        LC Classifications1753
        The Physical Object
        Paginationxvi, 67 p. :
        Number of Pages53
        ID Numbers
        ISBN 10nodata
        Series
        1nodata
        2
        3

        nodata File Size: 7MB.


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An enquiry into the causes of the present high price of muscovada sugars; with some remedies, humbly proposed for a grievance so considerable. In a letter to a member of parliament by printed for M. Cooper Download PDF EPUB FB2


An Inquiry into the Nature and Causes of the Wealth of Nations by Adam Smith

They are advantageous even to that part of the country. That part of its own produce with which such a nation purchases foreign goods, must consequently be sold cheaper; because, when two things are exchanged for one another, the cheapness of the one is a necessary consequence, or rather is the same thing, with the dearness of the other. The great number of people maintained by the fertile lands afford a market to many parts of the produce of the barren, which they could never have found among those whom their own produce could maintain.

In exchanging, indeed, the different productions of different sorts of labour for one another, some allowance is commonly made for both. These three seem to exhaust all the possible combinations of events which can happen in the progress of improvement; and during the course of the four centuries preceding the present, if we may judge by what has happened both in France and Great Britain, each of those three different combinations seems to have taken place in the European market, and nearly in the same order, too, in which I have here set them down.

However report seems little misplaced a they are talking about three plus years back. In such situations we can scarce expect to find even a smith, a carpenter, or a mason, within less than twenty miles of another of the same trade.

A good rice field is a bog at all seasons, and at one season a bog covered with water. In the British coin, indeed, the value of the gold preponderates greatly, but it is not so in that of all countries.exactly the same, but no greater than it actually was.

The greater part of Europe was, during this period, advancing in industry and improvement, and the demand for silver must consequently have been increasing; but the increase of the supply had, it seems, so far exceeded that of the demand, that the value of that metal sunk considerably. There are some sorts of industry, even of the lowest kind, which can be carried on nowhere but in a great town. Lord-chief-justice Hales, who wrote in the time of Charles II.

It may not, however, upon that account be altogether useless. But land, in almost any situation, produces a greater quantity of food than what is sufficient to maintain all the labour necessary for bringing it to market, in the most liberal way in which that labour is ever maintained. It is with such vineyards only, that the common land of the country can be brought into competition; for with those of a peculiar quality it is evident that it cannot.

The greater part of the cultivated lands in Cochin China are employed in producing corn and rice, the food of the great body of the people. The woods of Norway, and of the coasts of the Baltic, find a market in many parts of Great Britain, which they could not find at home, and thereby afford some rent to their proprietors. Meanwhile, the Federal Government pursued policies to eliminate state intervention in the sugar business, extinguishing the IAA and the Planalsucar, among other organizations.

An ox hide which weighs four stone of sixteen pounds of avoirdupois, is not in the present times reckoned a bad one; and in those ancient times would probably have been reckoned a very good one. But his land is commonly so extensive, that, with all his own industry, and with all the industry of other people humbly proposed for a grievance so considerable. In a letter to a member of parliament he can get to employ, he can seldom make it produce the tenth part of what it is capable of producing.

The land which is fit for potatoes, is fit for almost every other useful vegetable.