4 edition of Moʻade Yiśraʾel bi-teḳufat ha-Mishnah ṿeha-Talmud found in the catalog.

Moʻade Yiśraʾel bi-teḳufat ha-Mishnah ṿeha-Talmud

kaiserliche Palästinapolitik im Ersten Weltkrieg

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Published by Administrator in Hotsaʾat sefarim ʻa. sh. Y.L. Magnes, ha-Universiṭah ha-ʻIvrit

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    • Hotsaʾat sefarim ʻa. sh. Y.L. Magnes, ha-Universiṭah ha-ʻIvrit


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      • Includes bibliographical references (p. [416]-428) and indexes.Table of contents also in English.

        StatementHotsaʾat sefarim ʻa. sh. Y.L. Magnes, ha-Universiṭah ha-ʻIvrit
        PublishersHotsaʾat sefarim ʻa. sh. Y.L. Magnes, ha-Universiṭah ha-ʻIvrit
        Classifications
        LC Classifications1995
        The Physical Object
        Paginationxvi, 129 p. :
        Number of Pages93
        ID Numbers
        ISBN 109652238880
        Series
        1nodata
        2
        3

        nodata File Size: 10MB.


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Moʻade Yiśraʾel bi-teḳufat ha-Mishnah ṿeha-Talmud by Hotsaʾat sefarim ʻa. sh. Y.L. Magnes, ha-Universiṭah ha-ʻIvrit Download PDF EPUB FB2


Частини книг: in rabbinical

"" is a phrase from theforming the second half of a line in Sirach 44:14, widely inscribed on. A general survey of the history of the canon of the New Testament Page 570 6th ed. For instance, the Greek translation made by Ben Sira's grandson was included in thethe 2nd-century BC Greek version of the Jewish scriptures used by Diaspora Jews, through which it became part of the Greek canon.

Occasionally Sirach digresses to attack theories which he considers dangerous; for example, that man has no freedom of will, and that God is indifferent to the actions of mankind and does not reward virtue.

g, see: Sirach 42:12—14 "Do not look upon any one for beauty, and do not sit in the midst of women; [13] for from garments comes the moth, and from a woman comes woman's wickedness. The multiplicity of manuscript fragments uncovered in the evince its authoritative status among Egyptian Jewry until the Middle Ages. Speech 5:6,9-15; 18:15—29; 19:4—17; 20:1—31; 23:7—15; 27:4—7; 27:11—15; and 28:8—26 ; and• The book itself is the largest from antiquity to have survived. Set him to work, as is fitting for him, and if he does not obey, make his fetters heavy.

The book concludes with a justification of God, whose wisdom and greatness are said to be revealed in all God's works as Moʻade Yiśraʾel bi-teḳufat ha-Mishnah ṿeha-Talmud as in the history of Israel. Happiness 25:1—11; 30:14—25; and 40:1—30 ;• Sirach Explained The Book of Sirach, also called the Wisdom of Sirach or simply Sirach, and also known as the Book of Ecclesiasticus ; abbreviated Ecclus.

Sin 7:1—17; 15:11—20; 16:1—17:32; 18:30—19:3; 21:1—10; 22:27—23:27; and 26:28—28:7 ;• 36:24—25 "He who acquires a wife gets his best possession,a helper fit for him and a pillar of support.

2001 The Church in Ancient Society: From Galilee to Gregory the Great Clarendon Press, Oxford, England, p. Furthermore, Sirach contains a of "Simon the High Priest, the son of Onias, who in his life repaired the House" 50:1.

Lehmann, "The Writings of Ben Sira, the Dead Sea Scrolls and Temple Worship in the Liturgy of Yom Kippur", in Piyyut in Tradition, vol. The book itself is the largest from antiquity to have survived. Sirach is not part of theonce thought to have been established at the hypotheticalperhaps due to its late authorship, although it is not clear that the canon was completely Moʻade Yiśraʾel bi-teḳufat ha-Mishnah ṿeha-Talmud at the time of Ben Sira.

In the High Holiday prayer booka medieval Jewish poet may have used Sirach as the basis for a poem, KeOhel HaNimtah, in the "additional" service for the High Holidays.

Contents Illustration for Sirach, c. The question of which actually originated with Sirach is open to debate, although scholars tend to regard him as a compiler or anthologist. Occasionally Sirach digresses to attack theories which he considers dangerous; for example, that man has no freedom of will, and that God is indifferent to the actions of mankind and does not reward virtue.