06.08.2021 | History

1 edition of Commercial thinning of mature lodgepole pine to reduce susceptibility to mountain pine beetle found in the catalog.

Commercial thinning of mature lodgepole pine to reduce susceptibility to mountain pine beetle

a comprehensive guide to collecting Kentucky Derby mint julep glasses and shot glasses

  • 850 Want to read
  • 271 Currently reading

Published by Administrator in Canadian Forest Service

    Places:
  • United States
    • Subjects:
    • Canadian Forest Service


      • Download Commercial thinning of mature lodgepole pine to reduce susceptibility to mountain pine beetle Book Epub or Pdf Free, Commercial thinning of mature lodgepole pine to reduce susceptibility to mountain pine beetle, Online Books Download Commercial thinning of mature lodgepole pine to reduce susceptibility to mountain pine beetle Free, Book Free Reading Commercial thinning of mature lodgepole pine to reduce susceptibility to mountain pine beetle Online, You are free and without need to spend extra money (PDF, epub) format You can Download this book here. Click on the download link below to get Commercial thinning of mature lodgepole pine to reduce susceptibility to mountain pine beetle book in PDF or epub free.

      • Canada-British Columbia Partnership Agreement on Forest Resource Development: FRDA II.Co-published by British Columbia Ministry of Forests.Issued in collaboration with: Forest Engineering Research Institute of Canada.Includes bibliographical references: p. 19.Also issued online.

        StatementCanadian Forest Service
        PublishersCanadian Forest Service
        Classifications
        LC Classifications1994
        The Physical Object
        Paginationxvi, 57 p. :
        Number of Pages49
        ID Numbers
        ISBN 100772623139
        Series
        1
        2Special report (Forest Engineering Research Institute of Canada) -- no. SR-94.
        3FERIC special report ;$vno. SR-94

        nodata File Size: 6MB.


Share this book
You might also like

Commercial thinning of mature lodgepole pine to reduce susceptibility to mountain pine beetle by Canadian Forest Service Download PDF EPUB FB2


In Proceedings, Symposium on Management of Lodgepole Pine Ecosystems, October 9-11, 1973. ponderosae attacks in whitebark pine Pinus albicaulis Engelm. Other insects that can be damaging local pests are the lodgepole terminal weevil Pissodes terminaliswhich can be destructive to elongating terminal leaders; larvae of the Warren's collar weevil Hylobius warreniwhich girdles roots and the root collar; larvae of the weevil Magdalis gentilis, which mine branches; various sucking insects, such as the pine needle scale Chionaspis pinifoliaethe black pineleaf scale Nuculaspis californicaand the spruce spider mite Oligonychus ununguis ; and several defoliating insects, among which are the lodgepole sawfly Neodiprion burkeithe lodgepole needle miner Coleotechnites millerithe sugar pine tortrix Choristoneura lambertianathe pine tube moth Argyrotaenia pinatubanaand the pandora moth Coloradia pandora 7.

Cones are persistent, and serotinous closed cones accumulate for decades. ponderosae infestations without the problems associated with trap trees.

However, we speculate that baited traps may possibly trap beetles over a longer period than baited trees, because traps do not trigger release of antiaggregation pheromone as do attacked trees. Where canopy density was reduced, ether by us or by the insects, surviving trees significantly increased their resistance to attack over a 3-yr period. Theory of the relationships between oxidant injury and bark beetle infestation. The importance of lodgepole pine in the United States.

Lodgepole pine is a component in 27 of the 55 SAF western forest cover types. Rocky Mountain Forest and Range Experiment Station, Fort Collins, CO. The persistent cones are hard and heavy, with protuberant scales. Young, succulent seedlings may die because of high soil surface temperatures 13.

Modifying Lodgepole Pine Stands to Change Susceptibility to Mountain Pine Beetle Attack on JSTOR

Open stars indicate traps baited with four-component D. Hosts: All pines except Jeffrey pine are hosts. Cones are produced regularly from an early age and often are serotinous. There is also potential for significant genetic gains from selection of elite trees when thinning.